Tag: intuition

Double Vision: Intuition vs. Imagination

Decision makingTelling the Difference between Intuition and Imagination

I have heard that everyone is intuitive — we just need to trust our instincts. I, however, find it difficult to know the difference between my gut feelings and my thoughts. Also, I often feel vibrations like bubbles going up and down my body; sometimes they are strong, like a pulsating feeling combined with this feeling. It happens when I’m thinking of someone in a loving way, but at times it just happens out of the blue, like in a work meeting, even when I am just listening and not involved. I don’t know if it comes from a person in the meeting or from within myself, or maybe I am imagining it. How do you know the difference, and sort out what’s real from what’s imaginary? Thank you for your insights on this confusing issue. – T.

Dreamchaser:

Your plight is very common, so I’m really glad you asked this question. First, let’s explore some dictionary definitions of the experiences you’re trying to sort out:

Intuition:

– The direct knowing or learning of something without the conscious use of reasoning; immediate understanding.

– Something known or learned in this way.

– The ability to perceive or know things without conscious reasoning.

Logic:

– The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content

– A system of reasoning: Aristotle’s logic.

– The formal, guiding principles of a discipline, school or science.

As you can see, reasoning (or a lack of it) is central to both definitions. Intuition is a “knowing” that does not rely on reasoning. We know when it pops up inside of us, whether we have reason to or not.

Logic or thought relies on reasoning. In terms of inner experience, a thought is something that is loud, intrusive and annoying. By contrast, intuition is just there. It is quiet and still when we become aware of its presence.

There are four types of intuition. First is a feeling such as when we feel the hairs rise on the back of our necks or we “go cold” when something doesn’t feel quite right.

Second, though men do it too, women are famous for being able to sense what is really going on in a situation and accurately reading people’s thoughts and feelings in the absence of facts.

Third, inventors and business tycoons are often credited for having vision or the ability to see into the economic future, which leads them to great success.

Finally, spiritual insights into the nature of reality and awareness of the meaning behind experiences are considered crucial openers to mystical experiences of transcendence.

Many of us are taught to “use our heads” or ask, “What were you thinking?” We learn early in our lives that logic is crucial to success and well-being, but that is only part of the picture: It’s through our intuition that we receive divine guidance.

We can grow more intuitively aware by learning to meditate or by reading books and periodicals on the subject. There are lots of books available on intuitive development. Allow your own intuition to guide you to the one that is best for you personally.

I wish you a clear sense of “knowing.”

Astrea:

The best way to tell the difference between your imagination and intuition is through practice, sometimes for many years.

I have many years of experience with a feeling that is similar to your bubbles, and have learned that the feeling is always there when my intuition is working for me. I can tell the difference because I have made it a life-long project to discern the difference between what I think is true and what actually is true. This can be very hard to discern without a lot of practice.

If you’re just starting to figure that out, you’ll find it helpful to practice wherever you can and with whomever will let you. Get your friends to let you do readings for them, and find the psychic tools that are right for you.

I use astrology and tarot to back up my intuition when I’m working professionally, but I’ve tried just about every divination tool out there when reading for others. Fortunately, there are a lot of tools available now to help us focus.

When most of us started out, there was that one old tarot Rider Waite deck, and that was it. In the 1960s, sometimes even that was hard to find! Calmly go through tool after tool until you find one that will usually “speak” to you.

Sometimes even the best psychics make mistakes because, let’s face it, we’re not gods, and people have free will, and everyone is going to be off sometimes. Don’t get discouraged. Just keep at it until you’ve developed your technique for reading others to the point where you feel you can trust that part of your intuition.

While reading for others is pretty easy for most of us, when it comes to figuring things out for ourselves, you may find that it’s not such a snap. That’s my problem too. I can read for anyone else, but it’s much harder to read for myself or a family member.

I know things about others, but even after more than 40 years of reading for other people, I don’t seem to be able to defer to my own intuition every time. Most of the time I can, but this is a very recent development. Some psychics will say that they do a reading for themselves every morning. If I did that, I would have to go back to bed and stay there!

Whatever you choose to help you along, just remember: Intuitive work is just like anything else. You can’t master it overnight, and you won’t learn to trust yourself immediately. Time and practice are the two elements that will make you feel a lot surer of yourself!

Good luck!

If you have a question about a strange/paranormal experience, psychic development, astral projection, perplexing dreams, or some other metaphysical subject, please submit it to Kajama via the handy form below.


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Double Vision: Intuition vs. Imagination

Decision makingTelling the Difference between Intuition and Imagination

I have heard that everyone is intuitive — we just need to trust our instincts. I, however, find it difficult to know the difference between my gut feelings and my thoughts. Also, I often feel vibrations like bubbles going up and down my body; sometimes they are strong, like a pulsating feeling combined with this feeling. It happens when I’m thinking of someone in a loving way, but at times it just happens out of the blue, like in a work meeting, even when I am just listening and not involved. I don’t know if it comes from a person in the meeting or from within myself, or maybe I am imagining it. How do you know the difference, and sort out what’s real from what’s imaginary? Thank you for your insights on this confusing issue. – T.

Dreamchaser:

Your plight is very common, so I’m really glad you asked this question. First, let’s explore some dictionary definitions of the experiences you’re trying to sort out:

Intuition:

– The direct knowing or learning of something without the conscious use of reasoning; immediate understanding.

– Something known or learned in this way.

– The ability to perceive or know things without conscious reasoning.

Logic:

– The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content

– A system of reasoning: Aristotle’s logic.

– The formal, guiding principles of a discipline, school or science.

As you can see, reasoning (or a lack of it) is central to both definitions. Intuition is a “knowing” that does not rely on reasoning. We know when it pops up inside of us, whether we have reason to or not.

Logic or thought relies on reasoning. In terms of inner experience, a thought is something that is loud, intrusive and annoying. By contrast, intuition is just there. It is quiet and still when we become aware of its presence.

There are four types of intuition. First is a feeling such as when we feel the hairs rise on the back of our necks or we “go cold” when something doesn’t feel quite right.

Second, though men do it too, women are famous for being able to sense what is really going on in a situation and accurately reading people’s thoughts and feelings in the absence of facts.

Third, inventors and business tycoons are often credited for having vision or the ability to see into the economic future, which leads them to great success.

Finally, spiritual insights into the nature of reality and awareness of the meaning behind experiences are considered crucial openers to mystical experiences of transcendence.

Many of us are taught to “use our heads” or ask, “What were you thinking?” We learn early in our lives that logic is crucial to success and well-being, but that is only part of the picture: It’s through our intuition that we receive divine guidance.

We can grow more intuitively aware by learning to meditate or by reading books and periodicals on the subject. There are lots of books available on intuitive development. Allow your own intuition to guide you to the one that is best for you personally.

I wish you a clear sense of “knowing.”

Astrea:

The best way to tell the difference between your imagination and intuition is through practice, sometimes for many years.

I have many years of experience with a feeling that is similar to your bubbles, and have learned that the feeling is always there when my intuition is working for me. I can tell the difference because I have made it a life-long project to discern the difference between what I think is true and what actually is true. This can be very hard to discern without a lot of practice.

If you’re just starting to figure that out, you’ll find it helpful to practice wherever you can and with whomever will let you. Get your friends to let you do readings for them, and find the psychic tools that are right for you.

I use astrology and tarot to back up my intuition when I’m working professionally, but I’ve tried just about every divination tool out there when reading for others. Fortunately, there are a lot of tools available now to help us focus.

When most of us started out, there was that one old tarot Rider Waite deck, and that was it. In the 1960s, sometimes even that was hard to find! Calmly go through tool after tool until you find one that will usually “speak” to you.

Sometimes even the best psychics make mistakes because, let’s face it, we’re not gods, and people have free will, and everyone is going to be off sometimes. Don’t get discouraged. Just keep at it until you’ve developed your technique for reading others to the point where you feel you can trust that part of your intuition.

While reading for others is pretty easy for most of us, when it comes to figuring things out for ourselves, you may find that it’s not such a snap. That’s my problem too. I can read for anyone else, but it’s much harder to read for myself or a family member.

I know things about others, but even after more than 40 years of reading for other people, I don’t seem to be able to defer to my own intuition every time. Most of the time I can, but this is a very recent development. Some psychics will say that they do a reading for themselves every morning. If I did that, I would have to go back to bed and stay there!

Whatever you choose to help you along, just remember: Intuitive work is just like anything else. You can’t master it overnight, and you won’t learn to trust yourself immediately. Time and practice are the two elements that will make you feel a lot surer of yourself!

Good luck!

If you have a question about a strange/paranormal experience, psychic development, astral projection, perplexing dreams, or some other metaphysical subject, please submit it to Kajama via the handy form below.


Submit a Question

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Subject

Your Message

What Intuition Is and What It Isn’t

intuition-article-3An Excerpt from First Intelligence by Simone Wright

Following are several understandings about what intuition is and isn’t. These distinctions will assist you in further demystifying the process and will enable you to discern the subtle yet powerful differences between the tone and style of true intuitive perception and those of past emotional programming, learned behavior, and misguided understandings of the intuitive process. These clarifications will allow you to amplify and fine-tune your precision so that your accuracy and outcomes will become more and more reliable.

Intuition Is Not Based in Emotion

Intuition communicates in a neutral, unemotional fashion. The most common misconception about intuition, and why it tends to get a bad rap, especially in environments dominated by logical, rational, and, dare I say, masculine thinking, is the greatly erroneous contention that intuition is not to be trusted because it is based in emotion.

Since intuition is emotionally neutral, there is no “charge” of opposites (right/wrong, fear/love, good/bad). This is because it stems from the highest level of mind, which is unchangeable, im-movable, indestructible, and beyond emotion. The emotion tends to come the moment after you receive the information, or the “hit.” As quick as thought, you become emotional because the information you perceive triggers fear, worry, or anxiety, because it requires you to do something that you may not feel comfortable doing. Or, conversely, it triggers emotions of ease, anticipation, or joy, because the direction is in alignment with your highest good. The emotion comes from your response to the intuitive wisdom, not from the wisdom itself.

Intuition Is Inner Knowing; It Is Not External Learning

“How do you know what you know when you know it?” This was the question I asked a room full of detectives in the first moments of a two-day workshop designed to amplify intuitive intelligence in police officers. I wanted to get a feel for the room and to see what they thought was going on when they got a hunch or an intuitive certainty about something.
Every one of the detectives admitted to having many intuitive experiences on and off the job. Some of them were willing to say they didn’t really know what was involved in the process, but the majority of them said they believed their intuitive experiences were a result of their massive amount of training and their large number of years spent in law enforcement.

It is true that while on the job the officers take action based on impressions they perceive in the brain and body. But these “knowings” should be attributed to the automatic function of a brain that has studied, practiced, and experienced something so many times that the knowledge has been moved from the conscious part of the brain to the subconscious, or unconscious, part so the organ can conserve its energy to continue to store more information.
It is the brain on autopilot, where operations take place without conscious intervention. These unconscious states, while beneath awareness, are still experienced by our body as feelings, emotions, and mental impressions, and they significantly affect routine actions such as brushing our teeth and driving to work.

Modern computers and other forms of technology are designed to operate more intuitively — that is, to operate with greater creative ease and higher performance. But like the police detectives, these pieces of equipment are deeply coded and programmed so that their performance seems to appear intuitive. The “mind” of the computer has been taught what to do, and so it does everything it is supposed to do with seemingly magical skill. This ability, while interesting or inspiring, is not intuition. True intuitive intelligence is an inner knowing, a direct perception of and processing of information within the inner dimensions of mind, without access to previous study, knowledge, or experience. It is knowing without having to go through the process of learning.

Intuition Is Life Affirming

Intuition supports life at its highest levels of evolution and well-being and guides us so we can grow and thrive despite obstacles, regardless of how severe they may appear to our limited perceptions. This truth is reflected in the power of water to break down a mountain, a single acorn to produce an entire forest after a wildfire, or a tiny weed to crack a slab of concrete wide open so it can reach for greater light and potential.
Intuitive intelligence is highly energy efficient, and it guides us to our destiny via the path of least resistance, right action, and highest good. It guides us to solutions that are elegant and natural, that unfold without force, and that are advantageous to everyone involved. Intuitive intelligence understands that life supports life, and that to benefit one is to benefit the whole.

Intuition operates strictly in the present moment. It does not respond to past resentments or worries about the future. Its creative power lies in the eternal moment of “now,” and it uses that point of stillness to propel itself forward, toward greater evolution.
You will know you are not connected to the wisdom of your intuition if

• you are upset about the past or worried about the future;
• you hear the words can’t, won’t, shouldn’t, don’t, or what if;
• you find yourself needing to control the details or outcome of a situation; or
• you find yourself being critical of yourself, those around you, or the situation you are in.

These descriptions of what intuition is or is not illustrate the positive markers of intuition at its best. As you further develop your intuitive practice, I encourage you to continually check in with yourself to see if the information you are receiving aligns with these principles. If it does not, then you may have more work to do to ensure that your energetic foundation is what it needs to be, so that you can properly engage with the field. If the information you receive is aligned, then you can go ahead and take the appropriate action to move toward your goal.


About the Author

SIMONE WRIGHT, “the Evolutionary Mind Coach for Elite Performers and Visionary Leaders,” is the author of First Intelligence. She has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show and uses her intuitive skills to assist in police investigations, missing children cases, and corporate business strategies. Visit her online at www.simonewright.com.

Excerpted from the book First Intelligence ©2014 by Simone Wright. Printed with permission of New World Library, Novato, CA. www.newworldlibrary.com